The Light of the World is waiting

This time of year we hear the carols, we see the red and the green, we smell the evergreens, our mouths are feasting on great food and if we are lucky we touch the snow.

All of our senses are involved in the experience that is Christmas.

Our emotions, however, can hold sway on our perspective and can cause us to miss out on the most important thing about Christmas: Jesus.

We can walk around in the darkness of loneliness, sadness, grief, missed joy, loveless, pain, loss, despair, depression, anger, frustration, jealousy and a host of other things that come to mind.

We do not see. We walk in blindness caused by our own hearts when we fail to hear the Good News of the Gospel because of the cacophony in our brains that interferes with the simple message.

Jesus is here.

He is the Light of the World.

He came for us.

All of us.

Let Him be your Light this Christmas.

Come and See.

The Newborn King awaits.

Bring Him your darkness

and

Come into the light.

 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. 

The true light that gives light to everyone was coming into the world. He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him. He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God-children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth. John 1:1-5, 9-14 NIV

Advent is here: Do you have enough socks?

As we draw nearer to Christmas, the tensions mount. Our inadequacies become insurmountable stumbling blocks. We don’t want to let anyone down. We want to please everyone. How do we do that with our Long Expected Jesus on our minds and in our hearts? What does being the hands and feet of Jesus to a hurting world look like?

 

Do we have enough Christmas socks for every day of the week?

Do our children have enough?

How many pairs of Santa, Snowflake, Jingle Bell, and Angel earrings do we have?

Do we need another Christmas sweater this year?

Can we eke out one more Christmas with that blue number that’s 20 years old?

If we don’t look like everyday is perfectly full of Christmas Joy they will think we have the bah-humbugs.

How many dozen cookies do we need to drop off at school, salon, pet groomers, etc?

Did we make extra for the kids’ Sunday School teachers?

They would wonder if our child showed up without them. And the next appointment at the salon and the pet groomer’s would be embarrassing because we didn’t get them something.

Did we sign up to help in our child’s class for the “Holiday Party”?

How that’s going to happen with the toddler in tow? They are going to think we don’t have enough money for a baby sitter….

Have we gotten every teacher on our children’s gift list a present?

Oh, and mustn’t forget the principal, the assistant principal the secretary and attendance clerk! And the school nurse- since our little darlings visit at least three times a week. After all, what will they think if we don’t?

Are we the practice coach for the high school choir Christmas musical?

If we don’t help out the musical won’t sound as good as it did last year and it will reflect on us.

Did we make enough candy, cookies, snack mix, cakes for our husbands to take to work?

Did we make a double batch of each to take to our work?

You know our husbands and co-workers so look forward to our goodies we make every year!! They will think we don’t care anymore or that something’s wrong.

Have we made a list of Christmas card recipients we want to make sure we don’t forget?

How about putting them in a database on the computer so we’ll have them for future reference?

Where are the cards we received last year? 

You know we must send them a card this year, etiquette, you know.

Did we schedule a time for pictures with Santa for the kids?

Did we buy Christmas outfits for every child for the pictures?

What would the grandparents think if we didn’t send them the annual picture- they would think we forgot them on purpose. Boy, would that make for a very happy Christmas Dinner. Remember last Valentine’s day when we forgot to mail the cards? Don’t want a repeat of that conversation.

Did we schedule the progressive dinner with our lunch bunch friends and get the menu in order for this year?

They so look forward to it every year, but it’s getting harder and harder…

ON THE OTHER HAND…

What if we brought up the subject of spending the money we would have spent on the dinner to provide for those who have little reason to celebrate this year, would they hate me for spoiling their fun?

Have we scheduled in the shopping for the needy family with that group of 10th grade girls in the youth department at church?

The children in that family won’t stay warm this winter unless we bring them socks and jackets and hats and mittens and blankets. On Christmas Day there would be a peanut butter sandwich- maybe- without the food we take. And the girls begin to understand….

 Did you answer the voice mail the kindergarten teachers left for you-they need a volunteer to go with them to the nursing home to take Christmas cards and sing carols for them. Will you go?

The joy the children bring to those who can no longer care for themselves, for those who are so lonely because they have no family near, and for those who have forgotten nearly everything about life except the carols they learned as children is evident on every face. The joy the children bring back to school infects everyone they tell.

Did we make that phone call to invite the woman in our Bible Study who lost her husband a couple of months ago to the Christmas Eve service with our family? 

She’s only been back to Bible Study once since he died. Her son is serving in Afghanistan and she keeps to herself most of the time. Her heart is broken in grief; healing takes time but she’s not sure she has the strength to go on. She needs someone in her life right now to hold a hand to put an arm around her shoulders to help her continue. 

Did we welcome the refugee family whose children started attending our child’s school?  Is there a language barrier? Can we help?

They are so far away from home, and there is no home left. All of their relatives died. They came with the clothes on their backs. There is nothing left from before….

Have we stopped to talk with our kids about the Reason for the season?

Have we talked with our neighbors?

How about the co-workers with the perpetual frown on her/his face?

Do they understand why we celebrate?

DO THEY KNOW JESUS? How will they know unless …. 

 ‘Then the King will say to those on his right, “Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was ill and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.”

‘Then the righteous will answer him, “Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you ill or in prison and go to visit you?”

‘The King will reply, “Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”Matthew 25:34-40

You know the first set of circumstances don’t define us(me) or the people we connect with at Christmas, but sometimes we(I) can get caught up in the feel good work that indirectly gives us(me) the credit and we(I) can forget the hands and feet work of the servant of the High King whose coming we celebrate. 

How do you keep that from happening where you are? I’d love to hear what Jesus is doing through your kids, your family, your friends, your church and your neighbors to touch the world as His Hands and Feet.

Advent: Is the Season one of Anticipation or Dread?

glory

Advent – by its very definition is a period of waiting. It is a time of preparation of our hearts for the coming of Messiah, Redeemer, Saviour. Jesus.

It is when we reflect on past Christmases, when we read the verses from the second chapter of Luke, when we sing carols of angels and the Babe in the Manger, and it is when we pause and consciously, earnestly, deliberately worship The King of Kings. A time when we collectively remind ourselves of the first coming of Christ and look forward to the second coming of our Redeemer King.

As a child, I attended a conservative evangelical church and I knew nothing of Advent until my dad was stationed on an air base in West Germany in the early 60s. There I was introduced to the Advent Wreath- the practice of lighting a candle for each of the four Sundays before Christmas and lighting a fifth on Christmas Eve, then on Christmas Day all would be lit until they burned down. 

My family absorbed what we understood about it into our Christmas traditions. Even though we had no idea of its deep meaning, It evidently seemed like the thing to bring home from Germany. I still have the ceramic advent candle/wreath holder meant to hold live greenery around the base of the candles. It was the centerpiece of the dinner table and each Sunday evening during the Christmas season, as we sat down to eat, we lit the appropriate number of candles and when we were done we blew them out. It was a way to mark time up to Christmas. That was it.

Believers have different experiences and knowledge of how it’s properly celebrated depending on the traditions in the church they attend. Yes, now I understand there’s much more to Advent than lighting candles every week.

What I do know is that Advent, for some, is a far cry from the anticipation that most of us experience while waiting for Christmas Day to arrive with its presents under the tree and the celebration with friends and family. For them it’s a time of dread- old memories of past Christmases haunt, the uncomfortable air around the table that was as electric as Ben Franklin’s kite string in the storm as the family sat to eat together, the disappointment of forgotten gifts or thoughtless gifts or no gifts at all, the efforts made to please everyone so no one’s feelings would be hurt, the rituals that must be observed, the sadness of being alone during the holidays, and the list can go on for quite a while.

Lets face it- Christmas time brings many feelings as it approaches.  Those of us who get more excited with each day marked off on the Advent Calendar may little understand the gut wrenching that’s going on in another’s life waking up each morning to look at the calendar and know that there’s one less day between them and doom. For that is what it can feel like.

 I recently had a conversation with a friend about Advent. While I was looking forward to all the joy that Christmas brings, looking at it as I do with the grandmother filter on; she, however, had already started dreading it. For to her it brings trying to please loved ones who will not be pleased no matter what, it brings great efforts trying to keep the peace with all the dysfunctional personalities at the table and it means including people that she just feels too guilty to exclude from the Christmas dinner invitation even though their presence makes her just about lose her mind.  

She longs for quiet, non-commercial moments to remember the reason for Advent; for the coming of her Saviour.  She wants to meet Him in scripture and worship in solitude or with a few like minded friends. She long ago gave up the efforts of the presents under the tree in exchange for a few stolen peaceful moments in the hubbub that the season brings every year. 

She’s lonely in the middle of the eager shoppers and most acutely feels the need to be alone to protect her own feelings in the midst of the loud commercial promises of waking up and finding the car with the big red bow in the drive, or the opening of the small package just handed out that the woman opens deliberately slowly, knowing it’s a piece of jewelry and everyone watching the commercial sees the desperate hope in her face- will it be what she’s wanted all season? Or not?

She sees the buying, helter-skelter shopping and decorating not as fun but as a shallow substitute for what Advent really is. The presents she buys are never enough- big enough, small enough, pretty enough, enough enough.This year, she’s decided there will be none.

Over the years, she’s found that she just does not want to be in a room with critical relatives who destroy the intention behind her gifts when she’s put so much thought into the buying and even making sure she has the right wrapping paper for each gift. The dysfunctional family members who tear apart the meaning of the day with distress, dissension and disagreements she’d just as soon avoid altogether. 

She just longs to be with her Saviour.

Another friend lives alone and her family is miles away and emotionally distant. Those she knew as a child growing up are too old and feeble to celebrate or have passed on leaving great holes in her life especially at Christmas. She finds herself grieving more than celebrating. She mourns what was more than she enjoys what is.  She tries but it’s just too difficult to expose those sensitive nerve endings again to sadness, separation, selective exclusion and a flood of other feelings that she is not able to keep in check.

She finds herself repeatedly pouring out those feelings at the feet of her Saviour.

Still another acquaintance will experience this year as a widow, again, for the eighth year. Yet-every year feels exactly like the first year.  Her children are grown and have created a whole ecosystem around their lives they are living and she’s not a part of it. She sits by the tree in the evenings and reads the same verses that her husband used to read to the family when they were all together. 

Only now she’s alone and the only one who hears her voice is her Saviour.

Others have many feelings of grief and sadness at this time and just want to be able to say they’ve survived and made it through another one. The empty spot of a child who’s gone is grieved anew in the stark contrast of the lights of the tree and the ornament reminders of each year they were there and the years they’ve been absent. The inability to provide a proper Christmas dinner as the commercials push on us; or the perfect doll or toy for a child because there’s not enough for extra. When there’s never enough even for the day to day brings a hollowness, dark and hopeless to a parent’s eye. Yet there’s no escaping it- everywhere one goes the worldly world pushes itself upon us in the name of Christmas.

Would you pray with me for these brave souls who just want to worship the Saviour in peace? That Jesus will meet them just where they are and bring the comfort and joy only He can provide and that their worship at the manger will be uninterrupted and their hearts be full of  Him. Only Him. That they can shut out the world for just those few extra moments that are so badly needed before they step once more into the fray known as Christmas time. That their voice will be loud and clear as the angels’ were on that long ago night when the song went out over the barren hills and hearts waiting for a Saviour heard the joyful news that He is come!